DIY Bed Frame: How to Make a Wooden Bed Frame | The Home Depot
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DIY Bed Frame: How to Make a Wooden Bed Frame | The Home Depot

October 19, 2019


[MUSIC PLAYING] The bed is one of the main
focal points of the bedroom. To ensure it catches your
eye, and the eyes of others, why not create your own? In this instructional
video, you’ll learn how to make a standard wooden
bed frame for a queen size bed. It complements our video on
creating a wooden headboard. You’ll need wood screws,
bed rail handles, and other tools and materials that
will be covered a little later. Be sure to measure the area
that the bed will occupy to confirm you have enough space. Account for accent furniture,
doorway openings, and space needed to maneuver around the bed. Once your measurements have been taken,
gather the necessary amount of lumber to complete the project. Use wood glue for additional bonding
support throughout the construction. To get started, cut
the lumber pieces based on the dimensions outlined on your cut
list provided at the end of this video. Then use a pocket-hole jig to create
pocket holes for your cut lumber pieces. The holes are drilled at an
angle to hide the screws that connect the pieces together. The depth of your pocket holes are
determined by the thickness of your cut lumber pieces. The Home Depot sells
pocket-hole jig kits that you can use to complete this step. Use the guides provided to adjust
the thickness of the lumber you’re working with. You can cover each hole
with a pocket-hole plug. Be sure to follow the
complete instructions provided by your manufacturer when
using any pocket-hole kit. For this project, collect all
of the frame cross members and drill two pocket holes
on each end with the lumber pieces standing vertically. Lay out the frame cross
member so that you have one on each end of the frame sides. The middle cross members
get placed at 13 and 1/2 inches and 27 inches on the frame. Once they are in place,
screw them together. Repeat these steps to make the
other half of the bed frame. Line up the long sides of
the two frame assemblies. Clamp them together and
make sure they’re square. Mark the center of the conjoined
assemblies at 18 inches, then drill 3/8 inch holes
to bolt the pieces together. Insert the 5/16 by 4-inch bolt into the
conjoined pieces with the accompanying cut washer, lock washer, and nut. Then tighten to secure it. Now may be a good time to
transition the construction to a larger workspace if the
area or surface you’re utilizing isn’t large enough. Prop the frame assembly
by 1 and 1/2 inches. You can use scrap pieces of
lumber or the 2 by 4 and 1 by 4. Line one of the side apron
pieces even with the ends of the frame assembly with a 1 and
1/2 inch overhang on the top edge. Clamp into place. Measure and drill holes for the bolts 3
and 1/4 inches down from the top edge. 1 and 1/2 inches on the overhang side. Do this at 8 inches, 29 inches,
52 and 1/2 inches, and 73 inches. The holes should be in the center
of the 2 by 4 frame assembly. Repeat this step to attach
the other side apron. Next, attach the foot apron. Line up the foot apron
so that the ends are flush with the outer edge
of the side apron pieces. Clamp into place. Drill holes for the bolt 3 and
1/4 inches down from the top edge. Do this at 8 inches, 31 and 1/4
inches, and 54 and 1/2 inches. Insert and tighten the bolts in place. Repeat this step to
attach the head apron. Flip over the frame
assembly to attach the legs. One at a time, align them with
the end of the side apron. Then, secure in place with brad nails. In the same way that
you did the side legs, you’re going to attach
the front and back legs. The only difference is that they will be
aligned flush with the top of the apron and the face of the side legs. Next, attach the center supports
onto the frame cross members. Place these center supports onto the
cross frame members at 30 and 1/2 inches. And these center supports at 24 inches
onto the cross frame members shown. Use your speed square to
ensure the supports are square with the frame assembly. Secure in place with 2 and
1/2 inch pocket-hole screws. Finally, sand everything smooth. Wipe it down to get rid of the sawdust. And apply a nice coat of paint or
stain to complement your bedroom decor. Here are all the materials you’ll
need to build your wooden bed frame. Here is a cut list for the lumber
needed to complete this project. And lastly, you’ll need the
following tools for the job. For more detailed information about
this and many other popular projects, check out the DIY Projects and
Ideas section of the homedepot.com or talk to one of our store associates. Good luck. And thanks for shopping
at The Home Depot.

Only registered users can comment.

  1. Custom work is always more expensive than common made items. It is more expensive, but you earn the pride of building your bed frame. Anyone with money can buy a thing. Not everyone chooses to build it themselves. Pride of accomplishment people. Come on now.

  2. Would be nice to build if u have all those nice gadgets. For someone like myself I only have a cordless drill an a cordless circular saw. Would be nice to buy all of that that's predrilled an that comes with the hardware.

  3. Can someone please tell me what defines 'lumber'? I am trying to find out exactly what type of wood is used- is it a SOFTWOOD or something else? Thankyou…

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