English Composition Writing for Primary School – Writing the Introduction of a Composition
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English Composition Writing for Primary School – Writing the Introduction of a Composition

October 18, 2019


Hello everyone, welcome to the first
lesson of module 1. Module 1 consists of five lessons where you will learn a
basic structure for writing primary school English compositions. In this
module you will learn a basic composition writing made simple framework,
this is a step-by-step structure that you can follow to write a piece of
composition. I will guide you through each step of the framework so that you know
how to write a composition from the introduction to the body and to the
conclusion. In this lesson, lesson 1 we will focus on writing the introduction.
There are many ways that you can begin a composition, I’m sure you have learned
some ways in school. Some common ways to write an introduction are, you begin with
speech for example, begin with a sound, begin with weather descriptions, begin
with character descriptions, begin with a flashback which is more common in upper
primary. Now in this composition writing made simple framework, I am going to
teach you a very simple way to write the introduction for any composition
and I call this the character-focused introduction. To write a character -focused introduction, ask yourself this 4 questions. Who is the character in the
story? What was he or she doing at the beginning of the story? How was he or she
feeling at the beginning of the story? And why? Let’s take a look at this
example. Now look at this picture if you were given this picture how can you
write an introduction for this story? First of all ask yourself, who is the
character in a story for example let’s give him a name Jason. What was Jason
doing at the beginning of the story? Now he was walking to school right? How was
his feeling at the beginning of the story? He could be feeling happy. Why
was he so happy? Now give a reason for example it was the last day of school and
they were going to have a party in class. Now to help you write a character focus
introduction, I have come up with this acronym SAFE can you guess what SAFE, S-A-F-E stands for? SAFE stands for Speech, Actions and FEelings. Now I’m
going to show you how to use SAFE to write a character focus introduction. In
fact I like to tell my students that this is a safe way to write an
introduction, especially when you do not know what to write. So how can we use
SAFE to write an introduction? Now SAFE S stands for speech. We can begin this
introduction with a direct speech for example, bye Mum see you after school
Jason said as he got off the car. Now we move on to the next acronym A which
stands for actions. Ask yourself what could the character be doing at the
beginning of the story? For example, he waved goodbye to his mother and walked
towards the school gate. So you can see actions here waved goodbye , walked towards
the school gate. So when you are writing actions you use verbs, try to use
vivid verbs in your description or actions. Now we move on to FE which stands for
feelings. In fact F can stand for feelings E can be emotions so they mean
the same thing for FE stands for feelings. So think about the feelings of
the character at the beginning of the story. How was the character feeling? For
example Jason was in high spirits as it was the last day of the term and they
were going to have a party in class. Now let’s read this introduction from the
beginning. It goes like this, bye Mum see you after school Jason said as he got
off the car. He waved to goodbye to his mother and walk towards the school gate.
Jason was in high spirits as it was the last day of the term and they were going
to have a party in class. So in this very simple example, I have shown you how you
can use SAFE to write a character focused introduction. Once you are used
to using SAFE to write your introduction you can
add in more direct speech, more actions and more feelings. But for the sake of
just giving you a clear example now, I have come up with this short paragraph.
You can see that we begin this composition with a direct speech,
followed by some actions and we have also describe the feelings of the
character. So this is how you can write a character-focused introduction. Let’s look
at another example. Now in this example the topic given is An Unforgettable
Incident. Can we use SAFE to write introduction? Ask yourself what were the
characters speech, actions and feelings at the beginning of the story? For
example, hurry Dad I shouted, this is a direct speech, I pulled my father towards
the roller coaster, actions here, my family and I were at the Universal
Studios for the first time. I was quivering with excitement, so that is
your feelings, and I could not wait to try out all the rides so there you go a
very simple introduction using SAFE – SAFE speech actions and feelings. Now it
doesn’t mean that you have to always go in the order of speech, actions and
feelings. Let’s look at this example, hurry Dad, you begin with speech, I
shouted in exuberance, you have a feeling here. I pulled my father impatiently towards
the roller coaster. My family and I were at Universal Studios for the first time.
I was quivering with excitement and could not wait to try out all the rides.
As you can see, the sequence is speech, feelings, actions, feelings and feelings.
So we have rearranged them instead of speech, actions and feelings. Now we have
speech, feelings and actions and followed by feelings again. So this is what I mean
you can rearrange SA and FE in any order as long as you have all three in
your introduction, you will be fine. Let’s look at example 3. Tom go and do your
homework now. So we begin with speech again. My mother hollered I rolled my eyes
and frowned. Now this is a description of the characters feelings, but it can also
be considered as actions. Reluctantly I shut down the
computer and took up my homework – actions here. Feeling miserable, I opened the window
to get some fresh air – feelings and actions. Let’s look at example 4. Ben
dashed out of this classroom like a prisoner set free. So we begin with an
action for this composition instead of direct speech. Finally it’s recess, the
direct speech is here at the second sentence, he muttered, quickening his steps
as he approached the canteen (this is an action here). Joining the queue at the
chicken rice stall, (another action) Ben glanced at his watch impatiently (feelings
here). What have we learned in this lesson? Let’s recap – this is a very simple lesson
on writing a character-focused introduction, using speech actions and
feelings. Remember SAFE. It includes speech actions and feelings in your
introduction. I’m sure many of you have learned how to begin a composition with
speech or dialogue, but many students have told me that after writing that
first sentence of direct speech, which they do not know how to continue. So SAFE is
in fact a great way for you to write an introduction. After writing your direct
speech you can move on to describe the characters’ actions and feelings. Now you
can you SAFE in any order, you can begin with speech, if you are not good at
beginning with speech or the story doesn’t make sense if you begin with
speech, you can begin with what the character was doing (his actions). Or you can
also begin the introduction with how the character was feeling. Now a word of
caution in primary school composition try not to write too many direct speech
or dialogue. 1 to 2 speech in a paragraph is more than enough, especially if
you are in the lower primary. So I hope you have learned something in this
lesson, try out the assignment at the bottom of this video, print it out and
try writing some introductions using SAFE. So have fun writing, thank you,
bye.

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