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How To Write Great Lower Primary English Composition

September 18, 2019


Hello parents if your child is in
primary 1 or 2, composition writing might be something new. Does your child know
how to write a composition? Let’s take a look at the composition framework for
lower primary. This is an example of a four-picture composition. Now, do you know that most of these four-picture compositions follow a common sequence? Let me show you. Picture one is the beginning of the story. Now we call it
the introduction. Pictures two and three are the body of the composition. Here,
there is usually a problem and sometimes a solution. Sometimes the solution is
shown in picture four but most of the time picture four is the ending of the
composition; it is also known as the conclusion so this is the sequence of a
four-picture composition. Now let us take a look at the different parts of the composition framework one at a time Let’s first take a look at picture one. Now what is happening in this picture? Here we can see the main characters and
the setting of the story As mentioned earlier, picture one is the
introduction or what we call the beginning of the story. In introduction
the main characters usually make their first appearance, so we can ask ourselves
the question ‘Who’? Who is the main character in this story, give him or
her a name. It is important to give your main character a name so that you can
refer to this character using his or her name throughout the story. In the
introduction very often we also know the setting or introduce the setting of the
story. Now setting means the place that means we ask ourselves ‘where’, where did this story take place? Setting also
can refer to the timing of the story so we can ask ourselves
when did this story take place. Now let’s look at picture two. After writing the
introduction we move on to write the body of the composition which is usually
shown in pictures 2 & 3. In most primary school 4-picture compositions the main
character usually faces a problem. In this picture 2, we can see clearly the
events that led to the problem. This is also known as the rising action of the
story. Now the events that led to the problem is another character, a boy
running past the main character and knocking into him. So this is the
rising action, the events leading to the problem. Now when writing the body of a
composition we always try to describe the actions of the character, so we ask
ourselves the question “what?’. What was the character doing or what happened to the
character? We should also describe the feelings of the character and the people
around him so we asked the question ‘how?’. how did the character feel? How did the
people around him feel? So we focus on actions and feelings when we are writing
the body of our composition. Let’s move on to picture 3. Picture 3 is still part
of the body of the composition and this is usually the most exciting part of the
story, we call it the climax. Here, the character usually faces a problem. We can describe the actions of the character so we ask ourselves
what happened to the character or what was the character doing, what is the
problem in the story. Again we should also describe the feelings of the
character and the feelings of the people around him so once again we ask the
question ‘how’, how did the character feel how did the people around him feel. Focus on actions and feelings again in picture 3 After writing the body of the
composition, we come to the conclusion or the ending of the story. Now picture 4
shows the ending of our story. Here we describe the resolution; we can also call
it the solution to the problem or the falling action. Here we focus on these
two questions too – ‘what’ and ‘how’. The ‘what’ refers to the actions of the characters –
what did the characters do to solve the problem and the ‘how’ refers to the
feelings of the characters – how did the main character feel, how did the people
around him feel. Once the problem is solved the story will be coming to an end; that
is also what we call the conclusion or the ending of the story. Now we can write
a short paragraph or about two to three sentences to conclude the story. In the
conclusion, we can describe the characters thoughts and feelings about
what had just happened, we can also describe the lesson learned or his hopes
for the future or any decisions that the character has made. Many students end
their stories abruptly either because they do not know how to end their
stories or they do not have enough time to write a proper conclusion. In this
course you will learn how to write great conclusions for your compositions

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