Reichstag Building in Berlin, Home of the German Parliament
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Reichstag Building in Berlin, Home of the German Parliament

November 20, 2019


The Reichstag building is a historical edifice
in Berlin, Germany, constructed to house the Imperial Diet, of the German Empire. This
imposing building houses the Federal German Parliament or “Bundestag” and was originally
completed in 1894 to meet the need of the newly-unified German Empire of the Kaisers’
for a larger parliamentary building. The Reichstag was intended to resemble a Renaissance palace,
and its architect, Paul Wallot, dedicated the building to the German people. The Nazi leader Adolf Hitler exploited the
fire which gutted the Reichstag building in 1933 by blaming the Communists for the arson
and for attempted revolution. There is good evidence to suggest, however, that his followers
were actually responsible and that this was a manufactured crisis. When German reunification
became a reality, the new republic was proclaimed here at midnight on the 2nd October 1990. The Reichstag has undergone considerable restoration
and alteration. The building is now the second most visited attraction in Germany (after
the Cologne Cathedral), not least because the addition of a spectacular glass dome designed
by the British architect Norman Foster. The large glass dome at the very top of the Reichstag
has a 360-degree view of the surrounding Berlin cityscape. The main hall of the parliament
below can also be seen from inside the dome, and natural light from above radiates down
to the parliament floor. The Reichstag building is well known in the
art world thanks to Paris-based Bulgarian artist Christo’s mammoth ‘Wrapped Reichstag’
project in 1995. The entire building was swathed in silver cloth for two weeks that summer.
You can visit the dome for free but you will need to register online in advance in order
to do so.

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  1. The Reichstag building is a historical edifice in Berlin, Germany, constructed to house the Imperial Diet, of the German Empire. This imposing building houses the Federal German Parliament or "Bundestag" and was originally completed in 1894 to meet the need of the newly-unified German Empire of the Kaisers' for a larger parliamentary building. The Reichstag was intended to resemble a Renaissance palace, and its architect, Paul Wallot, dedicated the building to the German people.

    The Nazi leader Adolf Hitler exploited the fire which gutted the Reichstag building in 1933 by blaming the Communists for the arson and for attempted revolution. There is good evidence to suggest, however, that his followers were actually responsible and that this was a manufactured crisis. When German reunification became a reality, the new republic was proclaimed here at midnight on the 2nd October 1990.

    The Reichstag has undergone considerable restoration and alteration. The building is now the second most visited attraction in Germany (after the Cologne Cathedral), not least because the addition of a spectacular glass dome designed by the British architect Norman Foster. The large glass dome at the very top of the Reichstag has a 360-degree view of the surrounding Berlin cityscape. The main hall of the parliament below can also be seen from inside the dome, and natural light from above radiates down to the parliament floor.

    The Reichstag building is well known in the art world thanks to Paris-based Bulgarian artist Christo's mammoth 'Wrapped Reichstag' project in 1995. The entire building was swathed in silver cloth for two weeks that summer. You can visit the dome for free but you will need to register online in advance in order to do so.

    Video: Reichstag Building in #Berlin, Home of the German Parliament http://youtu.be/85rYMM7mTH0

  2. Since i came to berlin more than one year i tryied to visit this buliding 2 times but the german securty system and the police did not allow me after investigation with me and in last no strange

  3. Germany should've tried to restored it as much as it was originally, not vomit extreme modernity into it. Sure, it looks nice, but it doesn't look great anymore.
    I hope one day they decide to renovate and restore as much of the original building from the 1800's as they can. I've seen images of the interior. It was AMAZING.

  4. i-pray-far-rite-will-not-win-too-many-seats-like-Nazis-did-in-1932-elections!—–AFQ-or-wwatever,–i-like-Left-Party!–bye-bye-Anniela-Merkel!

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